Colts’ Carson Wentz put on COVID list; what it means for Eagles

Wentz goes on Colts’ COVID list; what it means for Eagles originally appeared on NBC Sports Philadelphia

With just two weeks left in the regular season, the Colts have added former Eagles’ quarterback Carson Wentz to their Reserve/COVID-19 list.

Under current NFL rules, since Wentz is still presumably unvaccinated, he will be out at least 10 days. That means he’ll at least miss the Colts’ game on Sunday against the Raiders.

The Colts’ backup is rookie Sam Ehlinger and they also have Brett Hundley and James Morgan on their practice squad. In any case, losing Wentz certainly won’t help them down the stretch. Unless an old friend is on his way:

Obviously, everyone first should hope that Wentz is OK. But this could affect the Eagles’ draft status, although not as much as you would have thought earlier in the season.

The good news for the Eagles is that Wentz is already well over the estimated number of snaps he’d need to play to reach the 75% threshold that will ensure the Eagles get a first-round pick from that trade.

READ: Eagles place Derek Barnett, 3 others on COVID list

After last week, Wentz had played 976 of 998 snaps this season. The Colts are on pace for 1,131 snaps, which means Wentz would need to hit around 848 to hit 75%. As you can see, he’s already well over that. (And remember, Wentz would only need to hit 70% if the Colts make the playoffs).

So the Eagles are getting a first-round pick from the Colts. It’s just a question of where that first-round picks lands.

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If the season ended today, the Colts would be in the playoffs and that pick would be No. 23. (The Eagles are also in line to have No. 19 and No. 20).

As long as the Colts make the playoffs (they have a 97% chance according to FiveThirtyEight), the best pick the Eagles could get is No. 19. But this could affect seeding in the AFC playoffs. The Colts are currently the fifth-seed. Obviously, the deeper they go into the playoffs, the worse that pick becomes.