NYC shooting suspect Frank James pleads not guilty to terrorism

The raving madman who allegedly shot 10 people on a subway train last month told a judge he was feeling “pretty good” right before he pled not guilty to terrorism charges during his arraignment in Brooklyn federal court Friday. 

Frank James, 62, said little else except to confirm that he understood the charges and his rights and that he was “competent” enough to move forward with the case. 

The Bronx-native is accused of spraying 33 bullets onboard a Manhattan bound N-train on April 12, after allegedly letting off a smoke bomb as the subway pulled into the 33rd Street station in Sunset Park. 

Ten people were struck by bullets and another 19 were injured. 

James, who wore a khaki jail outfit and a blue surgical mask that was hanging off of his face, is facing two charges for the crime – committing a terrorist attack on a mass transit system and firing a gun during a violent crime, court records show. 

Frank James is arrested on April 13.
AP

He faces life in prison if convicted. 

As Judge William Kuntz read out the indictment against James, he looked at the justice and down at the table in front of him as if he was reading something.

When Kuntz mentioned the government could seek forfeiture of his assets in the event of a conviction, his eyes grew wide and he raised his eyebrows. 

The aftermath of James' bloody rampage on April 12.
The aftermath of the bloody rampage on April 12.
AP

At the end of the proceeding, he was remanded back into federal custody, where he is being held without bail.

Prior to the attack, James posted a series of YouTube videos raving against Mayor Eric Adams, the mental health care system and a plethora of ethnic groups. 

“Mr. Mayor, I’m a victim of your mental health program,” James said in one lengthy video.

People lie injured after the shooting.
People lie injured after the shooting.
AP
Victims' phone cameras captured the chaos following the shooting.
Victims’ phone cameras captured the chaos following the shooting.
AP

“I’m… now full of hate, full of anger, and full of bitterness.”

He also criticized the mayor for not doing more to combat homelessness.

“Eric Adams, Eric Adams: What are you doing, brother? What’s happening with this homeless situation,” he said while referring to the subway. 

“Every car I went to was loaded with homeless people. It was so bad, I couldn’t even stand. I had to keep moving from car to car.”